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JUSTICE
Library Instruction West 2020
Seattle, Washington
July 22-24
#liw20
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Friday, July 24 • 11:00am - 12:15pm
Epistemic bias in the information literacy classroom

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Since the publication of her 2007 monograph Epistemic Injustice, Miranda Fricker’s conceptual framework of epistemic injustice has been widely discussed across disciplines as a useful lens through which we can explore how humans relate to one another as both knowers and seekers of knowledge. It has not, however, yet been widely discussed within the context of libraries and librarianship. Given the growing conversation in our field surrounding librarians’ role in communicating the importance of truth and the potential pitfalls of unchecked or unacknowledged bias, this is an important moment for librarians and information professionals to interrogate how we communicate about “facts” and the potential biases within our practice which may be supporting structural inequity.

In an era of intensive focus on equipping citizens, students in particular, with the intellectual tools necessary to detect fallacies masquerading as truth, it is equally important to reflect on what we as information professionals and educators are espousing when discussing who or what students can trust. What roles do testimony and lived experience have in our classrooms, research, and lives? Instruction which begins and ends with scholarly publishing neither adequately prepares students for the epistemic landscape they face, nor addresses the narrow perspectives which have been and continue to be privileged in scholarly conversations.
By mapping Fricker’s notion of epistemic injustice on to ILI I hope to present a novel lens with which instruction librarians can consider how they address issues of authority both in their curriculum and pedagogy.

Speakers

Friday July 24, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm AST
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

Attendees (4)