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JUSTICE
Library Instruction West 2020
Seattle, Washington
July 22-24
#liw20

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Wednesday, July 22
 

12:00pm

Registration Table
The registration table is available from 12-6pm on Wednesday, July 22 on the first floor of Odegaard Library. You can pick up your name badge, buy a ticket for the Theo Chocolate Factory tour, get local/housing information, learn how to take a self-guided tour of UW Libraries, and sign up for optional dinner dine-arounds any time while the registration table is available.

Wednesday July 22, 2020 12:00pm - 6:00pm
University of Washington, Odegaard Library

1:00pm

Just Us: Unconference for BIPOC Library Workers
Registration is limited to the first 40 registrants. Attendees must pre-register for the unconference as part of conference registration.

Join Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) library workers for this open discussion of topics relevant to the current sociopolitical landscape, anti-racist instruction practices in the classroom, resisting neutrality, facilitating difficult conversations, etc. Participants will decide session content. Content could include, but is not limited to: challenging power and privilege of predominantly white institutions (PWIs), strategies for active engagement in anti-oppressive work in teaching and learning, navigating the intersectionality of our identities, discussion of experiences of multiracial and multiethnic people, and strategies for self-empowerment/resiliency/self-care.

This session is open for folks who identify as people of color and/or Indigenous.

Lily De La Fuente (she/her/hers) is the Humanities Librarian at Reed College in Portland, OR. Her primary focus is to highlight immigrant, diaspora, and multicultural materials while advocating for low income and first generation college students.

Alyssa Jocson Porter (she/her/hers) is a Filipina-American tenured reference & instruction librarian at Seattle Central College, where she is the liaison to the STEM and Creative Arts programs and coordinates collection development.

Jessica Koshi-Lum (she/her/hers) is a tenure-track instruction librarian at Renton Technical College in Renton, Washington.

Ann Matsushima Chiu (she/they) is fourth generation Japanese American social sciences librarian at Reed College in Portland, OR, who focuses on critical library instruction, zines, event programming and information seeking behavior of undergraduate students.

Speakers

Wednesday July 22, 2020 1:00pm - 4:00pm
University of Washington, Odegaard Library
 
Thursday, July 23
 

9:00am

KEYNOTE: No ICE in the Library and Other Methods of Resistance
Recently libraries have experienced intensified relationships with the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). From canceled immigrant rights programming due to uncertain threats of ICE raids in libraries to the revelation that major library vendors such as LexisNexis, Thomas Reuters, and Elsevier supply data to ICE surveillance programs, there has been an increase of uncertainty around emerging levels of data surveillance in the library. As undocumented people, refugees, DREAMERS, and permanent residents experience increased targeting, surveillance, restriction to resources, and the threat of deportation, public and academic libraries become a space that must toe the line in favor of immigrant rights.

By looking at the ways in which information technologies have been redesigned around immigrants, this lecture encourages direct action against agencies that are enforcing violence on immigrants, advocating for justice as a verb in the library, The library has traditionally been argued as a neutral space, and the librarian a neutral actor in that space. This lecture focuses on the history of direct action in the library that leads to social change, and the importance of those tools in contemporary forms of surveillance in the library. I advocate for tangible modes of resistance as a necessary model of justice in the library.

Dr. Melissa Villa-Nicholas is an Assistant Professor at the Harrington School of Media and Communications and Graduate School of Library and Information Studies (LIS). Her research interests include the history of Latinxs with information technologies and information spaces, Latinx socio-techno practices, and critical information and technology studies. Dr. Villa-Nicholas teaches LIS students on inclusion, race and racism, intersectionality, and use and users of information.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Melissa Villa-Nicholas

Dr. Melissa Villa-Nicholas

Assistant Professor, University of Rhode Island
I am a scholar of Latinx information and technology histories and practices, the social constructions of information technology, and the critical analysis of human information and technology behavior. I am an Assistant Professor in the Harrington School of Communication and Media... Read More →


Thursday July 23, 2020 9:00am - 10:15am
HUB Ballroom

11:00am

Dimensions of Academic Library Leadership: Balancing Instruction & Management
Participants will engage in a facilitated conversation about the particular challenges faced by academic library managers who retain instruction responsibilities, or plan to in the future. Nurturing and mentoring others, and creating and sustaining safe spaces while navigating power dynamics can be demanding emotional labor. Prioritizing our responsibilities, managing our own workloads while encouraging, monitoring, and appraising the work of others, and simultaneously protecting our own time and well-being can all influence our capacity to excel in either role. This experience elicits questions like:
-Is management “real” librarianship?
-How useful and productive is it to maintain a librarian’s practitioner role, delivering instruction and other public services working directly with students and faculty, when taking on management responsibilities?
-What elements of my instruction experience enhance my capacity as a leader?
-What leadership qualities enhance my teaching experiences?
-With a combined instruction and management workload, is it realistic to prioritize innovation in the classroom?
-How do I stay connected with students and faculty enough to know when something needs to be refreshed, and find time for innovative planning?
-What tools and supports do I need to grow in my varied roles?

We hope to begin building a community of practice of library managers who teach through discussion of the questions above, and other concerns brought to the group by presenters and attendees. Facilitators will provide tools to elicit individual reflection and group discussion, as well as a virtual platform the community of practice to continue the conversation.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Arnold-Garza

Sara Arnold-Garza

Assistant University Librarian for Access Services, Towson University
avatar for Claire Holmes

Claire Holmes

Asst. University Librarian, TU Cook Library
Claire Holmes is the Assistant University Librarian for Research & Instruction at Towson University's Albert S. Cook Library. In addition, she is a Research and Instruction Librarian and the Liaison Librarian to Towson’s Departments of Special Education and Instructional Leadership... Read More →


Thursday July 23, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 307 (Seats 30)

11:00am

Metacognitive Information Literacy Assessment: Putting Students at the Center
Oregon librarians have created a metacognitive self-assessment tool for information literacy that is derived from threshold concepts articulated in the ACRL Framework. As part of three years of research and testing, the instrument was tested for use in fall 2019 with students in 20 foundational writing courses, and several first-year-experience courses in a community college setting. Session participants will learn about the development of the tool and some ways it’s been used in teaching, as well as a critical reflection on its potential to empower IL learners.

A 2017 report from the National Institute for Learning Outcome Assessment titled “Equity in Assessment” calls for culturally responsive practices in both curriculum and assessment. Panelists will discuss how, when used thoughtfully, a metacognitive assessment approach has the potential to increase equity by positioning students as experts on their own learning, and holds promise for transferring skills and knowledge. We will also discuss the challenges presented by teaching with self-reflection and question whether it moves us towards a more just and equitable curriculum.
The panelists will include the librarians who led the research project to develop the self-reflection assessment for information literacy, an instructor who has been using the metacognitive tool in teaching this year, and an information literacy student who has used the self-assessment as part of their college experience.

The panel will critically consider the various audiences this assessment could serve, and discuss from their perspectives the implications of the shift to a metacognitive approach.

Speakers
SR

Sara Robertson

Librarian, Portland Community College


Thursday July 23, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 334 (Seats 60)

11:00am

Teaching Work, Learning Justice: Critical Pedagogy with Student Employees
The customary home of the instruction librarian is often someone else’s classroom, governed by norms and expectations that may not align with our own. In the presenters’ efforts to engage in a more transformative teaching praxis, we focus on the learning space created by and with our library student employees. Whether our students are staffing public service desks or completing technical projects, they form an engaged community ideally suited to collaborative, dialogic learning via their relationships with us and each other. Moving from a training to a teaching model grounded both in critical pedagogy and emergent strategy offers a generative space to dig into nuance, make mistakes, embrace experimentation, and support reciprocal modes of mentorship. Drawing on connections strengthened over months and years working together, the presenters will explore these practices as a means of breaking down hierarchies and imagining more equitable relationships amongst library workers and student staff. Such relationships can create more equitably distributed and just ways of operating, empowering student learners to bring their ideas into the workplace and engage in meaningful decision making. Furthermore, librarians and staff are emboldened to create teaching and learning environments that mesh with their values, without the frustrations of incongruous faculty expectations. As a model of shared power and justice, we hope to inspire library workers to consider not only their student workspaces as potential pedagogical sites but also other extracurricular spaces where more robust and reciprocal relationships may be developed with students.

Speakers
avatar for Megan Watson

Megan Watson

Performing Arts Librarian, Reed College
RF

Robin Ford

Science & Accessibility Librarian, Reed College


Thursday July 23, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 337 (Seats 24)

11:00am

Unequal footing: Advocating for teaching librarians & creating a more equitable practice of librarianship
The aim of justice through teaching tends to focus on the teacher as facilitator of justice for their students rather than themselves. Without a groundwork of respect, understanding, and solidarity in our instruction programs and among colleagues, it is unlikely that we can effectively pursue social change through our classrooms. This session considers questions essential to justice and teaching in libraries: Is it easier to seek justice on others’ behalf than our own as librarians? Does librarianship promote its core values of democracy, freedom, and social responsibility only for its patrons, doing so at the cost of those within the field? How are the expectations of teaching even more burdensome for those of us who embody some form of marginalized identity? What can we do to lift one another up?

The speakers will bring the power dynamics of library instruction to the forefront, in order to ground ambitious aims of justice in the everyday. Participants will be asked to reflect on their positions and expectations at their institutions, and through small group discussions, we will determine what an equitable instruction practice could look like. Participants will brainstorm specific steps they can take to realize these aims at personal, departmental, or profession-wide levels, and create a larger impact through small and intentional actions.

Speakers

Thursday July 23, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

11:00am

Using OERs to teach information literacy through a social justice lens
This session will focus on methods and strategies used by two academic librarians to teach a credit-bearing information literacy course with an emphasis on diversity and equity. Making the choice to develop our course using open education resources allows us to introduce topics of equity and inclusion on day one.  Open education resources (OERs) are published under a creative commons license, freely accessible to everyone, and allows users to remix or modify the original work. Adoption of open course materials affords us the opportunity to seamlessly integrate perspectives from members of marginalized communities to counterbalance the white hegemonic narratives pervasive in more traditional curriculum and textbooks.
 
While OERs should be lauded as a cost-savings measure and reduces barriers to information access we need to be cautious not to reproduce the same inequities in legacy publishing models. Our curated social justice themed OER content serves as a springboard to introduce concepts of structural oppression in academic libraries and injustices in existing scholarly communications models. Students are encouraged to use a more inclusive strategy to gather resources when conducting research to ensure they are capturing authors that are often excluded from scholarly discourse. These discussions also facilitate student engagement with the ACRL information literacy framework.

Speakers
avatar for CJ Ivory

CJ Ivory

Assistant Professor & Librarian, University of West Georgia
CJ Ivory is Assistant Professor and Instruction Librarian at the University of West Georgia where she teaches Information Literacy & Research. She also serves as a campus coordinator for Affordable Learning Georgia, a statewide initiative to support the implementation of open education... Read More →
avatar for angela pashia

angela pashia

head of learning & research support, university of west georgia


Thursday July 23, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
MGH 238 (Seats 35)

11:00am

Beyond the minute paper: using learner self-reflection to ensure equity in instruction
For many instruction librarians, assessment of learning outcomes is already part of their practice. But what about assessing goals that are less observable, such as efforts to make workshops relevant and inclusive? In this presentation, we will demonstrate how instructors can evaluate these important goals to ensure a just learning environment for their learners. For example, many instructors end workshops with a “1 minute paper” that includes a reflection question meant to help students and instructors alike with tying up a session and giving them a chance to ask for additional help. While sometimes amusing and insightful and sometimes heartbreaking, the 1 minute paper can be even more effective. We offer a way to recraft this activity in order to make it a more powerful, more reflective, and more useful evaluation tool. We will show participants how to use student self-reflection after a workshop to evaluate the inclusivity goals of their instruction. This for in-person or online instruction and provides learners and instructors alike with an opportunity to engage in reflective practice. This change can lead to greater retention of information for learners, improvement in teaching for instructors, and a more just learning environment for everyone.

Speakers
avatar for Dominique Turnbow

Dominique Turnbow

Instructional Design Librarian, UC San Diego


Thursday July 23, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

11:00am

Critical information literacy is for everyone: developing a community-based information literacy course
This session will explore our experience in designing and delivering a month-long critical information literacy course in the Street Humanities program, a local program designed to introduce adults currently accessing social support services to the post-secondary education experience.

Founded in 2005, the Street Humanities program is administered jointly by the College of New Caledonia and the Association Advocating for Women and Communities in Prince George, BC. This program provides a free, supportive introduction to higher education for adults who have historically faced barriers in our community. This program presented a unique opportunity to reach students who have been unable to access academia and bring the concepts and critical skills of information literacy outside the bounds of our university and into the community.

We explicitly designed this course to empower students to become both creators and stewards of their own information through an understanding of the existing systems of information creation and dissemination, and the structures of power informing these systems. This session will provide an overview of our curriculum, a reflection on our experiences teaching in this program, and lessons learned moving forward into our next iteration of this course. We will also discuss the challenges we faced, both personally and pedagogically, in designing this course to be mindful of the wide diversity of lived experiences of the participants in this program.

Speakers
AD

Annelise Dowd

NA, University of Northern British Columbia


Thursday July 23, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

11:00am

Empowering novice learner engagement in the scholarly conversation: San Jose State University’s Library Research Scholars Program
ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy acknowledges that there are established power and authority structures that can disempower novice learners’ abilities to participate and engage in the scholarly conversation. In higher education, these systems often disregard undergraduate student voices because of their limited fluency in the language and practices of the discipline. Coupled with a lack of authentic undergraduate research experiences for developing familiarity with the evidentiary sources, methodologies, and modes of discourse in a field, undergraduate student perspectives are often nonexistent. At San Jose State University, we developed a year-long, Framework-integrated, library-led program that would provide undergraduate students with an authentic research experience from idea to dissemination, enabling their engagement and contribution to the scholarly conversation in their field of study.
 
Beginning in Fall 2019, the Library Research Scholars Program (LRSP) provided three undergraduate students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to effectively develop and implement a research project through hands-on experience, a librarian mentor, and a weekly instruction session. At the end of the academic year, the LRSP students are expected to contribute a research product to the institutional repository and to share their findings at a campus-wide event. In this presentation, information on the development and outcomes of the program, with specific focus on the Framework-based curriculum, will be discussed and shared. Student feedback and voices will also be shared. Attendees will be able to use the information to start their own program or use parts of the curriculum in other ways that would encourage and empower novice learners to participate in the scholarly conversation.

Speakers
avatar for Ngoc-Yen Tran

Ngoc-Yen Tran

Research Impact Librarian, San Jose State University


Thursday July 23, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

11:00am

Alexa’s a nightmare dressed like a daydream: Implementing artificial intelligence and virtual assistants in library instruction
“Alexa, can you find research for my paper?” While this question may come across as humorous, or even ludicrous, it is not far off from being a reality. The emergence of virtual assistant devices, powered by artificial intelligence, has been one of the biggest technological disruptions in everyday life over the past five years. Virtual assistants have the power to alter the information seeking landscape by influencing the behaviours and habits of researchers. This workshop is designed to explore how we use AI in our everyday research processes. We will present different models of virtual assistants used in higher education and how library instruction can play a role in teaching users how to be digitally literate in regards to AI. Our current framework for library instruction is centred around information literacy and does not account for the use of assistive devices. Amazon’s Alexa, Apple’s Siri, and the Google Assistant are already being implemented in elementary and high schools across the globe, though not every student is afforded the same opportunities to use this technology. A future generation of researchers is either being taught to interact with these devices, or their colleagues will be doing so, in an academic context. This workshop will address the potential biases and implications of using AI in research. Participants will have a chance to interact with devices, test research questions, and explore their own profile biases in this interactive workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Wheatley

Amanda Wheatley

Liaison Librarian for Management, Business, & Entrepreneurship, McGill University
Interests include gamification, artificial intelligence and the ceramic Death Star I painted.


Thursday July 23, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
MGH 234 (Seats 35)

11:00am

Usable Instructional Materials are Inclusive Instructional Materials: Using Gestalt Principles and Plain Language to Create Effective Teaching Tools
Instruction Librarians frequently design teaching materials for students, faculty, staff, and colleagues. For these materials to be readable and accessible, they must contain accurate information and should follow guidelines for usable document design. Good design makes documents easier to use, helps documents stand out from other pieces of information, and lends credibility to document creators. 

A few simple tips, such as following Gestalt principles and using plain language, can improve document usability. Keeping the needs of people with visual, motor, and cognitive impairments in mind when creating a document can improve usability for all users and is a more efficient use of time than making retroactive changes to documentation to make them ADA compliant. 

The presenters will demonstrate how adhering to these and other guidelines will improve accessibility and functionality of library research aids. They will also direct attendees to resources to help librarians create usable instructional materials. Workshop attendees will apply knowledge learned through an interactive “document redesign” activity using their own or example library instruction materials. 

The purpose of the document design activity is to model the redesign process. We will divide participants into small groups. We will ask each group to redesign a document in accordance with the principles discussed in the presentation, using colored markers and large pieces of sticky paper. After attendees have engaged in this activity in their small groups, we will ask them to engage in large group discussion about how they would improve the existing documentation and why they made those choices. 

Speakers
JT

Jennifer Turner

Instructional Services Librarian, Minnesota State University, Mankato
avatar for Jessica Schomberg

Jessica Schomberg

Media Cataloger/Assessment Coordinator, Minnesota State University, Mankato


Thursday July 23, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
MGH 295 (Seats 35)

1:30pm

Relentless Pursuit of Truth: Empowering Student Facilitators to Interrogate Information
Michigan State University's Multi-Racial Unity Living Experience (MRULE), is a grass-roots program that provides a platform for students living on campus to engage with others from diverse backgrounds through facilitated discussions [http://mrule.msu.edu/]. In these facilitated round-table discussions (RTDs), the student Intercultural Aids (ICAs) select and research current topics, and lead groups in conversation. In order to prepare students to effectively facilitate RTDs, a two-week immersive summer training program is held on campus for incoming and returning MRULE students. In Summer 2019, the MRULE-ICA program coordinators approached a group of librarians about designing a 3-hour workshop to support ICAs in their discussion preparation and facilitation duties. The goal of the session, as articulated by one ICA coordinator was to “guide students on how to best find and use research tools in the relentless pursuit of truth, particularly on relevant complex social issues.”

This session will demonstrate portions of the lesson plan that we developed for the ICA program. Three members of the six-person instruction team will walk attendees through activities and discussion that introduced ICAs to web evaluation strategies, implicit bias in searching, and how algorithmic bias affects the conversation around important political issues. The session was designed to empower ICAs to make more informed and politically aware information choices and understand how their own positionality might affect the information they find. We hope that attendees will come away with ideas for doing the same.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea McMillan

Andrea McMillan

Chicano & Latino Studies Librarian, Michigan State University


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
MGH 234 (Seats 35)

1:30pm

Promoting Justice in the Credit Classroom through Open Pedagogy
In recent years, librarians have become driving influencers and supporters of open educational resources (OER). However, OER is simply one part of the larger open movement within higher education. The open pedagogical movement, which sits at the intersection of learning, technology, and social justice, informs the very foundation, purpose, and outcomes of education to seek a more transformative experience. Since 2017, librarians at Oklahoma State University have been teaching a 3-credit information literacy course that focuses on critically examining information systems through the lenses of race, gender, class, and other identities. As part of these critiques, students were asked to engage with the concept of the cost of information--both literal and figurative-- and with the role of information systems in social justice. The course itself, however, followed traditional models of design, including purchase of a textbook, disposable assignments, and  most class work happening within the physical and mental confines of the classroom. While the course addressed concerns of open education, it did not in itself seek to disrupt the system in which it was situated. Over the past year, two librarians and an instructional designer collaborated to build open pedagogy more intentionally into library instruction, specifically within  the credit course.

Participants will explore strategies they can undertake to “open up” their classrooms and promote key tenets of open pedagogy: access, transformation, social justice, and collaboration. Presenters will share their own experiences, and invite attendees to join the conversation by considering ways to implement open pedagogy in their own lives.

Speakers
avatar for Cristina Colquhoun

Cristina Colquhoun

Instructional Designer, Oklahoma State University
avatar for Kathy Essmiller

Kathy Essmiller

Assistant Professir of Professional Practixe, Oklahoma State University
I have two kids, a pack of dogs, and an amazing partner who is a pediatric nurse. Also happy to talk about Open Educational Resources, the arts (I am a former MS/HS band director), educational technology and instructional design, and how amazing it is to get to work in a Library... Read More →


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
MGH 238 (Seats 35)

1:30pm

Using anti-racist instruction to provide services to users affected by incarceration
Librarianship is grappling with how structural oppression manifests and is furthered through the profession. This is occurring at a moment when the impact of policing and incarceration on people in the United States has reached a critical saturation. Over 2 million people in the US are currently incarcerated, the majority of whom are people of color, and many as a result of the manifestations of structural racism in American society. While services to incarcerated populations have traditionally been the focus of special libraries, it is imperative that academic librarians recognize how mass incarceration affects their users. By raising awareness of the racialized issue of mass incarceration in America, we will attempt to make visible a population that has been thus far underserved by academic librarians: incarcerated people and those affected by incarceration. This presentation will use an anti-racist framework, based in critical theory, to discuss our existing work in public libraries and library school programs and provide tools to instruction librarians for developing services to this population in their own environments.
 
At the end of this session, attendees will be able to: 1) explain how policing and incarceration affect academic library users, 2), describe two existing programs that provide services to people who are incarcerated, 3) reflect on the opportunities for incorporating services to incarcerated people into your library setting, and 4) implement an anti-racist framework into your instruction.


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

1:30pm

Bringing the Library Art Gallery into the Classroom
The SSU Library Art Committee curates exhibits for the Library’s gallery space; in tandem, the Committee develops course-integrated programming and aligns exhibits with the ACRL Framework to engage viewers with information and visual literacy concepts.  In this session, committee members will cover strategies for curating exhibits related to social justice, collaborating with disciplinary faculty on course-integrated instruction and programming, best practices for working with campus administration, and marketing and outreach opportunities.

The fall 2019 exhibit, Queeries: Queer Artists & Identity exemplifies the arts integration efforts of the Committee through course-integrated programs with the Art Department, Freshman Year Experience, and Women and Gender Studies Department. One of several examples the Committee will share is the collaboration between performance artist Seth Eisen, the Library, and an LGBTQ+ U.S. History class to create a course-integrated lecture and an on-campus performance. Librarians and Eisen developed a lesson in which Eisen described how he locates and uses primary source materials to develop his performance pieces, followed by a librarian-led discussion about the importance of collecting archival materials from underrepresented communities and making them accessible through finding aids, metadata, and preservation. Students examined and discussed LGBTQ+ materials from SSU’s Special Collections with the goal of inspiring questions for their research assignment. After the session, Eisen and his company led students through an interactive queer history walking tour on campus that he created using primary sources.
Committee members will share the exhibit’s supplemental LibGuide, a self-guided worksheet for the exhibit, and other outreach materials with attendees.

Speakers
MW

Mary Wegmann

Collection Development Librarian, Sonoma State University
avatar for Loretta Esparza

Loretta Esparza

Instruction & Reference Librarian, Sonoma State University
avatar for Catherine Fonseca

Catherine Fonseca

Catherine Fonseca is the Outreach and Inclusion Librarian at Sonoma State University in Rohnert Park, California. In this role, she develops and implements library programs, events, and practices designed to meet campus and community needs. Additionally, Catherine coordinates targeted... Read More →


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
HUB 337 (Seats 24)

1:30pm

Empowering Applied Learners and Shaping the Message and Method: Information Literacy Development at a Polytechnic in Canada
Information literacy skills and concepts are required to be used beyond the classroom, yet the focus in frameworks, standards, and writing situates them within traditional academic disciplines and not for daily life or the workplace. This denies the learner population the understanding of how these skills and concepts relate to their chosen vocations and personal interests. Excluding students outside of traditional academic fields reinforces an artificial divide between “white and blue collar” workers which serves to benefit the capitalist structures we are inevitability subject to; removing these divisions and thinking of information literacy beyond these fields would work towards empowering and giving autonomy to all learners.
 
The Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) is a polytechnic institution in Calgary, Alberta that offers apprenticeship, certificate, diploma, and baccalaureate degree programs. SAIT focuses on preparing students to work in key industry sectors in the province. The institution has traditionally built strong relationships with industry to remain agile to their needs and industry has increasingly expressed the desire for students to learn “soft skills.” This has resulted in an on-going conversation about how to teach and assess these skills.
 
In this session, we will outline past research and describe our approach to shaping the conversation on campus. We will explain how we have advocated for critical information literacy for applied learners in the curriculum and classroom, explain what we are currently doing in this area, and outline what we plan to do in the future.


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

1:30pm

Know, Do, Become: Using working professionals to promote information literacy skills in a library microcourse
When faculty ask librarians to provide classroom instruction it is often when students need resources for a specific assignment in the near future.  Many times those assignments involve writing a formal paper, using academic materials, and in an academic setting.  But what happens once students graduate and enter the “real world?”  What happens when students start to ask, “How does this library ‘stuff’ help me outside of school?”

This presentation discusses the evolution of an embedded online information literacy microcourse used in a university first-year experience (FYE) course and its connection to career readiness. Participants will receive an overview of the microcourse, the diversity of the student body, and the reasoning behind choosing an online format over the previously used face-to-face format in order to more effectively serve this student population. Participants will then learn how this academic library has sought to support the campus FYE motto of “Know, Do, Become” through this microcourse, incorporating video interviews from professionals in our community. Each interviewee discusses their use of information in their profession with connections to issues such as justice, ethics, and diversity. The professionals conclude with the information-related skills they would look for when hiring future graduates. Participants will have the opportunity to view one of the videos and engage in a reflective activity similar to those that students engage in during the course. Finally, data from our microcourse reflections and final survey will be shared, as well as next steps based on this information and faculty feedback.

Speakers
avatar for Rebeca Peacock

Rebeca Peacock

Assistant Professor/Instructional Design Librarian, Boise State University
Rebeca Peacock is an Instructional Designer and Assistant Professor, Librarian at Boise State University. She has an MEd in Instructional Design and Technology from Wayne State University and an MSLIS from Syracuse University. She has been involved with instruction and instructional... Read More →


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

1:30pm

Library Instruction beyond the Library: Information Literacy as Transferable Skills
Librarians are all too familiar with the seemingly required script for undergraduate library instruction. Along with introducing students to the dynamics of databases and how to access online resources, introductory one shots serve as an opportunity to prioritize scholarly resources to students, steering them away from the open web resources with which they are typically more familiar. But by prioritizing scholarly resources and discovery tools, do academic librarians risk devaluing the intuitive and self-taught research skills students bring with them into higher education? How does this privileging of information affect our students’ ability to construct an identity as a lifelong learner when their access to these resources is temporary?

This session will look at ways academic librarians can re-frame their lesson plans with a focus on transferable skills, connecting scholarly research with the information seeking skills that students from diverse backgrounds – such as traditional undergraduates, transfer students, adult learners, and veterans – bring with them into higher education. By making the transparent connections between library resources and open web resources like Google Scholar and Wikipedia more visible, librarians have the opportunity not only to demystify scholarly research but to demonstrate how information literacy isn’t just a skill set regulated to the college classroom. It is an intrinsic part of lifelong learning that students can carry with them long after they have access to an academic library and its resources.

Speakers
avatar for Alexis Wolstein

Alexis Wolstein

Assistant Professor; Information Literacy Coordinator, Colorado State University - Pueblo


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

1:30pm

Nurturing Familia: Affirming Teaching Librarians of Color
As librarians who identify as Latina, Chicana, Desi, immigrant, pocha, of mixed-status family, and visibly “other,” we challenge dominant ideologies of neutrality and objectivity as they are currently valorized in information literacy curricula through culturally sustaining pedagogical practices that celebrate and perpetuate linguistic and cultural pluralism (Paris, 2012). Resisting Eurocentric epistemologies hinges on our ability to be authentically present and approachable to first generation college students from underrepresented groups in ways that help them feel like they belong here. We explicitly underscore the value of community cultural wealth, emphasizing that unique cultural resources are salient to student scholar identity.

Having open conversations around justice in information processes is transformational for our teaching and teacher identity. In shedding the idea that lived experiences don’t belong in our pedagogies, we establish what Rendón (1994) calls a familia atmosphere. But familia must also extend to collegial interactions and institutional support, where we, too, feel as though we belong. In a profession with so few visible people of color, librarians of color (LOC) can feel isolated as a result of measuring ourselves against normative (Eurocentric) standards that privilege competition over cooperation. Therefore, how do we build up LOC to do the critical work of validating students of color in the classroom? We suggest that Relational-Cultural Theory (RCT), a feminist therapeutic practice developed at Wellesley College in the 1970s offers a practical, relational approach for developing affirming and supportive relationships among LOC that embolden us to be our whole selves in the classroom.


Speakers
avatar for Torie Quinonez

Torie Quinonez

Arts & Humanities Librarian, CSU San Marcos
avatar for Lalitha Nataraj

Lalitha Nataraj

Social Sciences Librarian, CSU San Marcos


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
HUB 334 (Seats 60)

1:30pm

Outreach as Teaching and Learning Opportunities
Outreach programming can be an alternative form of instruction where students can connect and learn from the librarian about library resources, while also teaching the librarian about campus and student life. Connecting with students outside the library and being invited into student centered spaces, such as cultural centers or student organizations create unique dynamics between students and librarians that can often result in deeper and longer lasting connections. Citing past and ongoing programs that have came out of collaborations between the libraries and the University of Iowa's Cultural Centers this session will explain how outreach to cultural centers can be a valuable teaching and learning opportunity that goes both ways. Understanding and reflecting on one's own positionality, either as part of the dominant group or role of authority, can help attendees assess the impact of their own work with student communities, especially whom are from vulnerable and underserved backgrounds, that may hopefully lead to more enhanced and genuine student-librarian collaborations.

Speakers
JS

Jenay Solomon

Undergraduate Engagement Librarian, University of Iowa


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
HUB 334 (Seats 60)

1:30pm

Piloting an Embedded Librarian Program: Learning about Indigenous Art Practice in the Classroom
In the fall of 2019, three classes were identified as structurally important for the possibility of embedded librarianship, as they are required by studio arts students and have potential for scaffolded learning outcomes: Arts 101 - Introduction to the Visual Arts or Sophomore Seminar, Arts 301 Writing about Art, Arts 401- Senior Projects. Studio arts students often do not readily recognize the relationship of research to their own practice and profession. Therefore, myself and our instruction librarian, embedded ourselves within the three classes to be situated at points of need and learn about how the students are discussing art. Within this process, the relationships between indigeneity, the art world, art practice, and personhood all came to the foreground. Questions were then raised: how does research relate to these processes; and how can librarians address these information needs? After sitting within these classes and talking with students, we developed a scaffolded information literacy program to present to the studio arts department.

Speakers
SQ

Sara Quimby

Institute of American Indian Arts Library


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
HUB 337 (Seats 24)

1:30pm

Utilizing the “Moccasin Telegraph” to Recruit Native American and Alaska Native Scholars Toward Library and Information Science Degrees
With a history of written conquest and rewritten pseudo-historical accounts of the American
Indian experience in the historical record, and to fulfill the need of Indigenous scholars from all
disciplines, I am calling our field to action: Recruit Indigenous Scholars in the Discipline of
Library and Information Science. Their expertise is needed!

Indigenous librarians empower learners by introducing Evidence Based Research (EBR) to
impress the need, significance and mutual benefits of Indigenous perspectives in the field of
library and information science. By doing so, early and contemporary works align in theory and
practice to recruit Native American or Alaska Native practitioners for the field of library science
Other evidence includes a 2011 pilot study by Wayne State and Syracuse University. The
findings illustrated a gap in cultural competence and a cultural mismatch from those of the
library and information science students.

Design an interactive map to consider the geographic locations of the Tribal Colleges and
Universities, in line with library programs. Internalizing the results with the goal to promote
student success, and develop sustainable partnerships between Tribal librarians and Academic
and mainstream librarians and information specialists.

Speakers

Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
HUB 334 (Seats 60)

1:30pm

Information Justice and Information Privilege in the Academy: Workshopping Information Has Value
At the University of Washington Libraries, discussions about how to incorporate information justice and privilege into our library classrooms led us to design microteaching sessions to workshop these concepts with our peers. The microteaching technique, which has small groups of colleagues work together to craft short mini-lessons on an assigned topic or theme, centers participant expertise and uses equity pedagogy as its framework, giving participants the opportunity to collaboratively design learning activities and practice teaching strategies. Recently, we have been reframing microteaching workshops with “Information Has Value” as the central theme, thus aligning content and pedagogy. The microteaching technique fosters creativity and encourages participants to try something new in a low-stakes, supportive environment. This workshop will allow attendees to engage actively with topics of information justice, information privilege, and information equity in order to brainstorm new approaches to effectively engage students in this national conversation.
In this workshop, participants will:

-- Invent or improve student learning activities around questions of information privilege, information justice, and inequitable information access as reflected in the Information Has Value frame;
-- Present those micro-lessons to peers;
--Observe and reflect on colleagues’ lessons in order to gain teaching ideas and techniques;
-- Have fun!

In this highly interactive workshop, participants will spend the majority of time engaging in small groups and observing and reflecting on the work of other small groups.


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
MGH 295 (Seats 35)

1:30pm

What is Library Instruction For? Designing information literacy for our real lives
This interactive workshop will highlight practices for reinventing information literacy instruction as a way to connect students with the information they need in their real lives. We will use prompts and activities to discuss the ways academic culture intentionally and unintentionally discredits non-academic information. By examining opportunities for realigning library instruction, we aim to empower learners to utilize information for the purpose of creating authentic connections to place, to others, and within themselves. We will also invite reflection on how to create and support teaching practices that encourage ways of finding and sharing knowledge sourced/created outside of academia (such as traditional and local knowledge, and dynamic community information) and expanding our beliefs about the role of justice in teaching information literacy. Following the model of environmental educators David Orr and Robin Kimmerer, we will also encourage a discussion of the questions: What is library instruction for? What should library instruction be?


Thursday July 23, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm
HUB 307 (Seats 30)

3:15pm

#researchspeeddate: Think/Pair/Share for Online & Hybrid Courses
Think/pair/share is an activity librarians and instructors regularly use in their teaching while students are present in a classroom. It offers opportunities for students to contemplate their answer to a question or prompt and discuss it with a classmate before sharing it with the whole classroom. Students benefit from sharing their thoughts and ideas with just one person before they are asked to share with the whole class.

But what about in an online or hybrid classroom? Students are likely to complete research activities alone - without any interaction with their fellow classmates. By pairing students up to interact with each other in person, over the phone, or with a chat app, they are automatically able to talk to and engage with a classmate who is working on the same research assignment they are. In the early stages of the research process, students are often unsure about their topics and they regularly report that discussion with another student offers them help and peace of mind.

This activity brings justice to students working in online spaces who are often there because of their schedules involving work, family, and other obligations. Offering these students a way to engage with fellow classmates around their research helps break them out of the silos that online courses so often produce. The core structure of this activity can be applied to student interaction during different stages of the research process or even for non-research assignments.

Speakers
avatar for Chelsea Nesvig

Chelsea Nesvig

Research & Instruction Librarian, UW Bothell/Cascadia College


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

3:15pm

Centering Student Voices: How a Student Advisory Board Can Impact Your Teaching
Students are at the core of the community we serve and it is vital to our mission that they have a voice in the Moraine Valley library. A Student Advisory Board (SAB) to the Library recognizes students as the primary stakeholders of the library and the group most impacted by decisions made about space, collections, services, code of conduct, and programming. The conversations among students and with librarians informed how the library structures space and code of conduct policies.

The Student Advisory Board (SAB) also impacts the teaching librarians do in the classroom and at the reference desk. There is a deficit-based narrative about students that we would like to disrupt. The SAB is ongoing evidence that students on our campus are deeply motivated, often juggling school, work, and families, yet still want to affect change where they can. Their involvement across different communities speaks to the nuanced ways they navigate and engage with information. Our information literacy instruction should reflect the complex ways our students understand the world around them.

The presenters will share practical aspects of starting a Student Advisory Board, and how the board has impacted the library, with a focus on instruction.

Speakers
TH

Tish Hayes

Librarian, Moraine Valley Community College


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

3:15pm

Just in Time Teaching Resources to Support Inclusive Classrooms
The Just-in-Time Teaching (JITT) project is an example of library outreach in a unique space and modality. It extends a partnership between the UC Davis Library and the Center for Educational Effectiveness (CEE) and gives us an opportunity to connect broadly with the campus teaching community and highlight our commitment to equity and inclusion.

CEE recently launched a series of online JITT resources, designed to “help instructors learn more about specific strategies they can readily implement in their classrooms.” JITTs must be student-focused, empirically-grounded and include practical teaching suggestions. They are currently available on CEE’s website, but there are also plans to embed JITT content in a student dashboard being developed for course instructors by the Office of Undergraduate Education.

Members of the library’s Instruction Peer Support Group worked collaboratively to develop a JITT focused on student library anxiety (Mellon 1986; Kulthau 1991) and strategies faculty can use to address it to promote more inclusive classrooms. We chose to highlight this topic because instructors may assume their students are familiar with how to use the library and do not build explicit guidance or support into their courses. This can impact the academic success of students from diverse backgrounds, including first generation and low income students.
 
The presenters will provide an overview of the rationale for the project, describe their collaborative development process and highlight their JITT on Library Anxiety. Details about faculty usage statistics (if available by July 2020) will be shared as well.

Speakers
MB

Melissa Browne

Student Services Librarian, UC Davis
avatar for Alesia McManus

Alesia McManus

Head of Student Services, UC Davis Library


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

3:15pm

Radical Conversations: How an Instruction Librarian Created Intentional Co-Curricular Spaces of Learning Through Event Programming
In what ways have you tried to engage your students to be critical thinkers, engaged citizens and research savvy scholars? What if your budget and library staff size didn’t reflect your big ideas? What if your library had never done events before? How would you go about it? This talk will present on the process of creating relevant, justice-centered, librarian-and-student facilitated events from scratch. Library events can be co-curricular learning experiences that complement the academic curriculum and enhanced when in collaboration with student organizations, clubs, community activists and scholars. Come learn how one small liberal arts library worked to create a space for discussion and dialogue amongst students, faculty, staff and the local community.

Speakers
avatar for Ann Matsushima Chiu

Ann Matsushima Chiu

Social Sciences Librarian, Reed College


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

3:15pm

The Library Is not the Center of the Universe: Helping Underrepresented Students in Their Own Spaces
In 2019, the University of Arizona re-implemented its Peer Information Counselor program - designed to allow students from underrepresented communities to work with members of the cultural centers on campus on research and library skills, but with one change. The previous program had students staff the reference desk and occasionally work in the centers, but the new program would have PIC students working entirely on outreach with students from these communities, whether by hosting study hours at the centers, actively collaborating with students on projects at the centers, or facilitating different research or outreach activities around campus with those students. In doing so, we hope to change perception of the library as a large, physically intimidating space filled with staff too busy to help students to one of a collection of caring staff and students willing to meet previously ignored communities on campus in their own space to help them.

Speakers
avatar for Jeremiah Paschke-Wood

Jeremiah Paschke-Wood

Undergraduate Engagement & Assessment Librarian, University of Arizona Libraries


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

3:15pm

(Dis) Empowerment and Digital Creation: Teaching Digital Tools
Participants in this workshop will work together to develop strategies for working with students to develop a better understanding of what it means to be active and ethically engaged contributors in an increasingly digital world.  As libraries transition from a model of supporting undergraduate students as information consumers to undergraduates as information creators with an awareness of information privilege our focus is on how to introduce students to digital scholarship tools, software, and industry standard applications via our teaching while centering the knowledge that access is mediated by location, funding, and scholarly affiliations.  We will workshop ways to balance acknowledging what students bring with them and working to accommodate varying levels of access and knowledge while understanding that teaching commonly used and industry standard tools carry ethical implications for instructors and students.  We can offer specific examples based on our work with Digital Scholarship tools and teaching these tools such as Reclaim Hosting, Manifold, and Omeka related to web hosting, installation, and storage for digital projects.  Discussions will include privacy issues, how we set students up for success post-graduation, and thoughts on how lessons from teaching about information privilege and subscription databases can be applied to conversations about digital tools.

Speakers
VK

Verletta Kern

Digital Scholarship Librarian, University of Washington Libraries


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
MGH 238 (Seats 35)

3:15pm

Collaboration and Conflict in Wikipedia: Empowering students and advancing justice in the world’s largest encyclopedia
Wikipedia is becoming an increasingly common pedagogical tool incorporated into classes by both librarians and disciplinary faculty alike. Wikipedia’s policies can be fantastic hooks for information literacy educators by opening questions around source evaluation and the difference between primary and secondary sources, but they also raise fundamental questions about notions of neutrality, representation and voice. The systemic bias inherent in Wikipedia - its imbalance of articles, its double standards around notability, its skewed editor base, and its stance on neutrality - means that it is imperative that classes incorporating Wikipedia address issues of justice. Wikipedia education has the potential to contribute to a more just society: student editors of Wikipedia can leverage their information privilege to democratize information and become active participants in knowledge creation in their communities. This session will examine the alignment between Wikipedia policies and information literacy concepts with particular attentiveness to the justice issues inherent in Wikipedia.  The presenters will consider how librarians can invest in educational interventions that encourage information literacy and student contributions to the public knowledge commons, while also confronting the conflict-driven and discriminatory aspects of the Wikipedia community. We will discuss both theoretical questions and present concrete activities attendees can apply. The session will be valuable both to librarians who are working with teachers who use Wikipedia and those who are teaching credit courses and interested in incorporating Wikipedia into their class.


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
MGH 234 (Seats 35)

3:15pm

Research Consultations as Intentional Care to First Year Students
The traditional teaching power dynamic, where teachers are experts and students are receptacles of information, persists despite the call for student-centered learning. Librarians can provide first-year students with the types of attention, support, and care often advertised by institutions, but lacking in students actual experiences. Furthermore, librarians are uniquely positioned to challenge the traditional power dynamic as we are not usually evaluating student work, which is particularly helpful to first-year students as they work to build their academic and emotional support systems in a new environment. Of the many teaching methods used by librarians, the individual research consultation is certainly the most affective for it allows interactive instruction that is personalized and humanizing. Individual research consultations provide librarians with the opportunity to lift students as autonomous and knowledgeable while information and resources are shared between them.

In this session, the presenter will lead attendees through a structure of individual consultations modeled from Care Theory and Relational Cultural Theory to demonstrate how consultations can be both instructive and nurturing learning environments. Afterwards, attendees will participate in a facilitated discussion of their own best practices for research consultations, their work with first-year students, and how they can equalize the power dynamics within their offices. Time will be allotted to discuss self-care in recognition of the labor required to provide such emotionally supportive instruction.

Speakers
avatar for Symphony Bruce

Symphony Bruce

Resident Librarian, American University
Symphony Bruce, Resident Librarian at American University, is an educator who works to support first-year students acclimating to their college experience. Largely influenced by her time as a high school English teacher, Symphony believes deeply in the power of relationships and care... Read More →


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 337 (Seats 24)

3:15pm

Value: a counterstory
The publication of the Value of Academic Libraries Report in 2010 essentially set the agenda for the assessment of teaching and learning in academic libraries. Its focus on the “articulation of library value to external audiences” emphasized the need for libraries (and consequently, teaching librarians) to prove their worth in higher education (Oakleaf, p. 11). As a result, the dominant narrative in assessment literature in LIS is focused on demonstrating the value of libraries to student learning, rather than interrogating what it is we value in teaching and learning. This single story of assessment prevents us from asking deeper questions about why we do assessment and who benefits from the labor, money, and time it demands.

In this session, we want to dismantle the "proof of value" rhetoric of assessment of teaching and learning. We intend to wrestle with the concept of value, which we see as a “sweaty concept.” Introduced by Sara Ahmed in Living a Feminist Life, “sweaty concepts” resist easy definition; they are difficult ideas that we must “stay with...keep exploring and exposing” in an effort to make meaning for ourselves (p. 12-13). This session will take a critical, feminist approach to determining what we value and how we embody it, one that appreciates difference and validates our unique circumstances and experience. We will discuss and reflect on both our shared and differing values and how we can incorporate them into our teaching practice.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica Arellano Douglas

Veronica Arellano Douglas

Instruction Coordinator, University of Houston Libraries
...


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 334 (Seats 60)

3:15pm

Canvas Collab: Teaming Up to Create Customizable Information Literacy Modules
Ventura College (VC), Moorpark College (MC), and Oxnard College (OC) are feeder schools for California State University Channel Islands (CI) and share the student learning outcome of developing information literacy (IL) in students.  In 2018, the four colleges hosted a Regional Information Literacy Summit. A lesson learned from this event was that continued collaboration would positively impact student IL skills as they advanced through the community colleges and on to CI. One path identified to achieve this was to create a suite of IL modules for Canvas for the colleges to share and customize to fit their needs.

Librarians from VC and CI began working together to create content for these modules in spring 2019 and piloted the content in different ways. VC embedded content in an online transfer-level English course and Physical Geology course. These courses were selected so both broader and more specialized IL content could be created. CI piloted the content in an online Early Dance History course and an Early Theatre History course. These courses were selected due to their research component and the need for more advanced topics, such as primary source instruction. The pilot courses allowed librarians to create varying levels of IL content and determine if the model would be sustainable.

In this session, librarians from VC and CI will highlight the benefits of their collaboration, describe their content creation process, and provide examples of their content in the hopes of inspiring attendees to collaborate and create with their local librarian colleagues.

Speakers

Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

3:15pm

Yes, please: How zines about consent can address power in the classroom
Zines offer personal, ethnographic perspectives on topics that are often ignored or outright excluded in mainstream academic publishing. In this short session, we will demonstrate how concepts often explored in zines can inform our classroom practices. Using zines from the Barnard Library Zine Collection, we will analyze how some zines have covered the topic of consent, especially in a sex education context, and draw connections to larger pedagogical considerations. This analysis will serve as one example of a concept made more accessible and relevant because of the unique lens provided by the zines in which are covered. In doing so, we hope to illustrate how zines help us as educators understand the impact of power in classroom practices that may otherwise be overlooked. This session will be followed by a zine workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Kristina Williams

Kristina Williams

Journalism and Government Information Librarian, Columbia University
KB

Kae Bara Kratcha

Entrepreneurship & Social Science Librarian, Columbia University Libraries
Entrepreneurship, Critical Pedagogy, Workplace culture building, Equity in librarianship, Gender & Sexuality, Queer Studies, Technology, Early career librarianshipI use they/them pronouns :)


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 307 (Seats 30)

3:15pm

“Stay maladjusted!”: Complaint, Refusal, and other Strategies for Addressing Damaging Dynamics in Academic Library Instruction Programs
In ‘The Problem of Perception”, and later in Living a Feminist Life, Sara Ahmed writes about a concept she has termed ‘disciplinary fatalism’; in diversity work, this concept describes how a pattern of behavior reproduces itself and becomes understood as certain or inevitable. If or when we acknowledge that these patterns are problematic ( “why are there so many white men on this panel?), rather than people in power addressing and changing the problematic pattern, we are perceived as the problem for making that problem visible (The all white 'manel' is because no people of color applied; why make a big deal out of it?)
 
This framework of disciplinary fatalism is useful in helping instruction librarians understand how expectations of subservience, deference, and inferiority have become internalized in our (gendered) profession. If librarians push back against a disrespectful request, or make an effort to assert their expertise and agency in the classroom, they are often dismissed and essentially told that being treated poorly is just a part of the job.
 
This presentation will build on work that women have been doing to interrogate the problematic dynamics in instruction work and speak to how complaint and refusal can function as advocacy, self-care, and justice work. We will also examine the role that library administrations and our larger public and academic contexts play in reifying and replicating these damaging structures. We have to, as Ahmed writes, "stay maladjusted" and not accept the conditions we've been expected to work in for so long.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Critten

Jessica Critten

Pedagogy and Assessment Program Lead Librarian, Auraria Library (CC of Denver, CU Denver, Metropolitan State University of Denver)


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

3:15pm

Building reciprocal relationships with teaching faculty to create an empowering classroom
How can doing primary research itself be a mode of doing justice? What skills can we bring to our students that can enable them to research their own histories as a way of changing their--and our--present and future? These questions are at the core of our work as instructional faculty and librarians, but the power imbalances between us often interfere with the larger project of teaching students to do history in and with the catalog.

This workshop, co-facilitated by a member of the teaching faculty and a librarian, will explore ways the two can work together to engage students in collaborative, critical instruction through lesson and assignment planning. We will discuss ways librarians can nurture connections and relationships with faculty despite institutional and individual barriers in order to create a welcoming space for students and one another as we embark on the shared project of radical research with students. Rooted in relational practice, which values mutuality, empathy, and intentional openness to change (Jordan, 2004), and engaged pedagogy, which focuses on the well-being of one another and values student expressions (hooks, 1994), this session will also build on the facilitators’ own experiences. Specifically, we will examine these issues via assessment of our Introduction to Transgender Studies class. Participants will then use this model to reflect own their faculty relationships and develop ideas for collaborative assignments that empower students.

How do we collaborate in ways that model open and equitable practices for our students? How do we, as two cisgender faculty members, share authority with our students? And how can our work, on multiple levels, advance justice for our transgender students and our larger communities?


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

3:15pm

Dismantling Deficit Thinking to Foster Inclusion, Equity, and Justice in the Library Classroom
What is possible when we renounce internalized deficit thinking and commit to teaching approaches that honor student strengths, funds of knowledge, and lived experiences? Deficit thinking often unintentionally shapes our approaches to students, especially those with marginalized identities. However, learning activities that tap into the cultural wealth and prior knowledge students bring to the classroom give students the academic space to inform the learning environment and build complexity into external narratives.

In this workshop, participants will actively reflect on their positionality including power, privilege, and marginalization, and the ways it affects their experiences and responsibility as an educator. Facilitators will provide an overview of the deficit mindset and how it pervades higher education, including the library classroom. Participants and facilitators will discuss a series of theoretical frameworks that combat deficit thinking, such as culturally relevant pedagogy and open pedagogy. Using these theories, participants will explore opportunities for practical application in one-shot classroom practices, information literacy learning activities, and programmatic design. The workshop will conclude with participants identifying goals to incorporate into their practice moving forward.

Speakers
avatar for Rosan Mitola

Rosan Mitola

Outreach Librarian, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Rosan is the Outreach Librarian for the University of Nevada, Las Vegas University Libraries. As the liaison to campus partners in academic support units, she designs co-curricular learning experiences for students and oversees the Mason Undergraduate Peer Research Coach Program... Read More →
avatar for Chelsea Heinbach

Chelsea Heinbach

Teaching and Learning Librarian, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Chelsea Heinbach is an Assistant Professor and Teaching and Learning Librarian at the Lied Library at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She is interested in in critical pedagogy, the affective nature of information behavior, and the intersection between civic engagement and information... Read More →
avatar for Francesca Marineo

Francesca Marineo

Teaching and Learning Librarian for Online Education, University of Nevada, Las Vegas


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
MGH 295 (Seats 35)

3:15pm

Zine-Making for Critical Pedagogy, Reflection, and Information Literacy
In this session, we will explore how conference participants can use zines to disrupt classroom hierarchies (both student-teacher and student-student), empower learners as creators of knowledge, and foster critical information literacy skills. Although zines have become a growing area of interest within librarianship, zinesters and zine readers developed communities around creating and sharing these materials long before librarians began collecting and teaching with them. With that in mind, we position our own zine schemes within the larger history of zines as alternative, DIY media and a form of material culture. We focus on how teaching with and creating zines has impacted our own pedagogy and teaching philosophies, as well as how zine-making can introduce critical information literacy skills and empower students as researchers, even in a one-shot. To support our stated learning outcomes, participants will read, work with, and contribute to a collaborative zine responding to several prompts about critical reflection and pedagogy in instruction. This collaborative zine will be assembled by the presenters and distributed to participants after the conference. In previous workshops we have hosted, we have found that folks engage well with this type of activity and these smaller group conversations generate larger group discussion points.


Thursday July 23, 2020 3:15pm - 4:45pm
HUB 307 (Seats 30)
 
Friday, July 24
 

9:30am

Frames of Reference: Examining “Scholarly” Concepts and Encouraging Alt Sources to Faculty
This lesson plan demonstration/small group discussion will focus on the concept of “scholarly” sources within the context of research assignments created by academic faculty, and provide attendees with strategies on how to discuss alternative sources, or alt sources, as options with faculty.

Generated from discussions in a workshop seires, this session will open with a discussion of what librarians, academic faculty, and students understand as “scholarly” information. Traditionally, “scholarly” information has referred to peer-reviewed academic journals, and the implicit understanding is that “scholarly” information is often superior to or more reliable than non-scholarly information. While there is some benefit to the processes of peer review, the discussion of “scholarly” information has neglected to acknowledge the facts of information privilege within the academic publishing framework and how this affects information by and about marginalized communities. This session will discuss research appropriation, oppression in academia, and other factors that have led to the current state of academic publishing, and transition into a conversation about how scholarly materials are framed within disciplinary lesson plans and how alt sources can be substituted. The session will provide librarians with strategies for discussing alt sources with faculty, and contextualizing how alt sources (such as online testimonials, videos, Twitter exchanges, and personal blogs) can contain more valuable, authoritative information when discussing marginalized groups.

Speakers

Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
MGH 238 (Seats 35)

9:30am

Narratives about Latinx Immigrants: A Critical Information Literacy Session
This lesson plan is based on a collaborative teaching experience between Research Librarian Pamela Mann and Prof. of Spanish Joanna Bartow and is designed to intentionally incorporate critical information literacy (CIL) into an advanced-level, community-based learning (CBL) course, Spanish in the Community. Although the focus is Latinx communities it may be adapted to focus on other issues or marginalized groups and other course contexts.

The CIL session, Narratives about Latinx Immigrants uses active learning strategies to explore how information about immigrants and immigration is created and disseminated by focusing on media framing and how cognitive and confirmation biases lead to different narratives about Latinx immigrants. During the session participants will explore how authority is created in specific communities by evaluating immigration research, policy and advocacy organizations’ websites and analyzing rhetorical appeals made by these organizations. We will also look at how these groups use information systems and tools to target specific audiences by comparing how information created by these organizations is used by news organizations, researchers, advocates and others.

The CIL session is grounded in the ways society and institutions construct narratives and frames within social, political and economic systems. The objective is to challenge the epistemologies of the privileged by asking students to rethink the politics of knowledge production and to reimagine the sites where information is produced.

Speakers

Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
HUB 337 (Seats 24)

9:30am

Remodeling Course-Related Instruction: An Information Literacy Pathway in the Natural Sciences
For decades, the UCR Library has supported introductory level courses in the College of Natural & Agricultural Sciences; feedback from students, however, indicated that outcomes felt repetitive and the sessions were seen as an extraneous hoop to jump through. Over the past two years, we have transformed our approach to these courses and structured a scaffolded information literacy pathway, beginning with sessions introducing library spaces and services, and culminating in hands-on sessions related to evaluating and using information. Learners are asked to engage with narrative scenarios embedded throughout the pathway that surface issues such as information privilege and the meaning of evidence. In this session, we will share how we developed relationships with three different academic departments, structured our scaffolded learning outcomes, and designed and implemented three distinct course-integrated approaches. We will also explore how we aligned our course modalities with our desired outcomes (including a peer-facilitated orientation, student co-designed online learning modules, and librarian-facilitated in-person sessions); share strategies for including librarian, course instructor, and student voices in the design process; and report preliminary assessment results. We will then facilitate a brief discussion with participants on how they might adapt this process and selected materials to their own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Dani Brecher Cook

Dani Brecher Cook

Director of Teaching & Learning, UC Riverside Library
MY

Michael Yonezawa

Librarian, University of California, Riverside


Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
MGH 234 (Seats 35)

9:30am

Avoiding Burnout and Renewing Your Teaching Self with Self-Compassion, Mindfulness, and Gratitude
Given the complex dynamics of our work and the need to perform emotional labor in our interactions with students and faculty, instruction librarians are particularly prone to burnout, defined as feelings of exhaustion, depersonalization, and a lack of self-efficacy. This is only exacerbated by vocational awe, our neoliberal achievement culture that constantly sends the message that we are not enough (or doing enough), and work environments in which teaching librarians are not supported. Burnout is a systemic issue, not an individual one, but practicing care towards ourselves and others and changing the way we view our work can help us protect ourselves from becoming burnt out. Drawing on the work of organizational psychologists, meditation teachers, voices from our own profession, and the experiences of the presenter, this session will explore ways to utilize self-compassion, mindfulness, self-reflection, and the practice of gratitude towards others to support our well-being, rekindle our passion for teaching, and help us to self-advocate. Attendees will come away with concrete ideas for self-care, boundary-setting, and mindfulness techniques they can use in their work.

Speakers
avatar for Meredith Farkas

Meredith Farkas

Faculty Librarian, Portland Community College
Portland Community College


Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

9:30am

Capitalist Alienation, Immigration, and Ethically-motivated Information Literacy Instruction: A marxist approach
The purpose of this session is to illustrate how ethical issues can strongly motivate critical information literacy (hereafter IL) in higher education while challenging the underlying capitalist imperatives that greatly influence their learning and educational goals (e.g., "employability"). Many of these imperatives illegitimately pass as natural or neutral despite their thoroughly constructed and normative nature. Such an ethically-motivated approach encourages students to identify misleading or false information and contextualize it in such a manner that unearths structural constraints and biases in the ways information is presented.  

I will provide a theoretical justification of my approach, based on an explicitly Marxist frame of analysis, and an account of my experience with this approach in practice. For the theoretical groundwork, I will begin by outlining Marx’s account of capitalist alienation, showing how it meshes with contemporary neoliberal capitalism. I will then discuss how the issue of immigration, especially in the context of current debates about open-borders, presents a unique ethical entry point by which to challenge capitalist alienation in IL instruction.

Given the significance of this issue and its real-world impacts, framing IL around immigration is both ethically-relevant and potent due to the wide availability of popular yet misinformed sources, on the one hand, and numerous nuanced pieces, most often academic or less accessible, on the other. I will conclude the session with an overview of one of the workshops I delivered using this approach, providing an overview of the process and, more importantly, student and faculty reactions to this approach.

Speakers
avatar for Dom Taylor

Dom Taylor

Philosophy Librarian, University of Manitoba, University of Manitoba
Dom Taylor is the Philosophy Librarian at the University of Manitoba. Following the completion of his MA in Philosophy, he worked as a government records and reference archivist at Library and Archives Canada. He then obtained an MLIS from Dalhousie University while working for Halifax... Read More →


Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

9:30am

Con-structions of Reality: Combating the Alienating Effects of Misinformation & “Fake News”
As educators of information literacy we are in a unique position to empower library patrons to resist the exploitative effects of misinformation campaigns and “fake news”. Considerable research in LIS, media studies, and psychology has been done on the phenomena of misinformation and its obfuscating effects on our population’s grip on what’s “real”.  Collectively, the research has revealed that consumers of “fake news” or misinformation are constructing belief systems that (sometimes intentionally) ignore factual information. Their distorted perceptions of reality make them increasingly – and alarmingly – reliant on their “beliefs” in determining what information is true or false.

This session analyses the interrelations between the disciplinary perspectives listed above through a Marxian lens in an effort to identify key areas where librarians can intervene in the increasingly problematic phenomena of “fake news” and misinformation. Additionally, this session exposes the exploitative mechanisms of “fake news” and misinformation so that librarians are better equipped to impart this knowledge in their teaching practices.

Marxist philosophy is a useful tool to analyze this issue because it is preoccupied with how systems of beliefs (ideologies) are utilized by dominant cultures to exploit subaltern groups (i.e. marginalized groups). Additionally, it helps explain how informational institutions support the complacency of exploited individuals, by distorting their perception of the conditions of their real material existence (or what actually is).This aids our identification of the forces of obfuscation embedded in “fake news” so that we may expose and resist them.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Carrigan

Michael Carrigan

Reference & Instructional Librarian, Web Projects, Vancouver Island University
Michael is a reference and instructional librarian at Vancouver Island University, located on traditional Coast Salish territory. He relocated to Costa Rica immediately after graduating library school in 2016, where he taught corporate ESL, and 6th grade English literature and math... Read More →


Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

9:30am

Informing the Crisis of Fake News
While misinformation, disinformation, and propaganda are not new phenomena, the phrase "fake news" recasts them as a novel crisis requiring different solutions and new saviors. This proposed session focuses on how "fake news" as a concept is used to further injustice and elide social conflict. When library workers better perceive how educators, industry leaders, or politicians wield the phrase "fake news" to legitimize certain interests and delegitimize others, they more effectively help students avoid being manipulated. They also become less likely to further oppression through  library instruction programs.

The rhetoric of "fake news" in education and industry constructs a crisis around information and evaluation, simultaneously positioning certain disciplines and ways of knowing as ineffective. "Fake news" presents a simple, stark binary of truths and falsehoods, rather than promoting a nuanced understanding of how humans communicate knowledge and interpretation of phenomena through language use. Instead of teaching students to evaluate communication by situating claims within social contexts, the phrase "fake news" masks social conflict in order to avoid discussion of values or ethics. The phrase prepares learners to readily discount both claims and claimants, to avoid recognizing historical and ongoing injustice.

Critical information literacy programs better promote justice when library workers help learners develop a practice of situating claims within social, political, and economic contexts. In addition to analyzing the pedagogical function of "fake news," or how the phrase teaches learners to adopt a dismissive attitude toward claims, the session will have library workers examine its use in institutional and political projects of delegitimization.

Speakers
avatar for Ryan P. Randall

Ryan P. Randall

Instruction Coordinator & Faculty Outreach Librarian, College of Western Idaho


Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
HUB 334 (Seats 60)

9:30am

Instructional Iteration to Better Serve International Students
An exciting program  that the University of Idaho offers is the graduate Global Student Success Program (GSSP). This program offers international graduate students, “an academic and cultural bridge to studying at the University of Idaho.” In spring 2018, Jylisa Doney was asked to teach these students library research skills. Although she had the best of intentions going into these sessions, it was evident that she did not fully understand the needs of these students, and traditional one-shot library sessions were not sufficient. In fall 2018, Jylisa Doney asked Jessica Martinez to join her and they collaboratively reworked the lesson plans. In this revision, they attempted to change tactics and broaden the lessons, but the results were very similar; students still struggled to grasp the key take-aways of the sessions and the presenters felt that they were not truly “meeting these students where they are.” Over the next three semesters, the presenters continued to iterate, assess, and iterate again to create sessions that successfully conveyed the fundamentals of library research to students across disciplines, from a variety of countries, and who speak different languages. In this presentation, we will discuss how instructional iteration allowed us to continually question our goals and outcomes as well as create an environment where uniqueness is valued and students can gain the foundational knowledge they seek and deserve. Participants will leave with new ideas to more effectively work in partnership with international programs and students at their own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Martinez

Jessica Martinez

Science Librarian, University of Idaho
I'm a new librarian who is interested in makerspaces, making libraries fun and inclusive places, impostor syndrome, marketing and outreach, and promoting women in STEM fields. Outside of work, I like good books, good beer, and exploring national parks.
JD

Jylisa Doney

Reference Librarian, University of Idaho Library


Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

9:30am

Matched or Misleading: Evaluating the Narratives of Text & Images in News
In an information environment heavily reliant on both text and images, as well as other multi-modal forms, it’s important to recognize the role of images on interpreting and understanding information sources such as news.  Images are powerful information sources that are more quickly processed than text and can impart a strong influence on the narratives we create.  At an extreme, images can be deliberately misappropriated or fabricated to create misleading or false stories or perceptions. Think deep-fakes.  Other forms of misuse may be less severe but can still generate inaccurate and unfair understandings of people, organizations or events.

One form of image misuse in the news environment is contextual misrepresentation, as coined by Thomas Palmer of the Picture Prosecutor. Contextual misrepresentation is the use of images with text that result in false meaning.

This session will demonstrate a lesson plan, used with undergraduate students, introducing the concept of contextual misrepresentation. Participants will understand the speed with which images are processed and the power they impart in multi-modal news evaluation. They will consider how images and text can create new narratives and will explore (in)appropriate pairings of text and images in news. In this demonstration, participants will be asked to evaluate news items, represented by text and image, to determine if the context is retained or misrepresented.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Davidson Squibb

Sara Davidson Squibb

Head, Research & Learning Services, UC Merced Library


Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
HUB 334 (Seats 60)

9:30am

“Do some research”: Research assignments and composition Teaching Assistants
How do Teaching Assistants (TAs) incorporate information literacy into research assignments?  Many instruction librarians work with classes taught by TAs, and while there is a large body of literature in composition studies about TAs and pedagogy, library literature tends to skip over the TAs.  When librarians write about incorporating information literacy into program curriculum, we talk about working with the faculty coordinators -- missing the TAs who may have a great deal of control over assignments.  At the University of New Mexico, we work most directly with students in first-year composition class, so we see only slices of the assignments, which made us curious.  What information literacy elements are present in these assignments?  We gathered research assignment prompts from TAs and coded them for information literacy elements.  We want to pursue a train-the-trainer approach with TAs, and this study helped us to check our assumptions about how TAs talk about research in assignments.  As we worked on this project, we asked ourselves, “How will we have a constructive dialogue about incorporating information literacy that is not deficit focused?  How will we be mindful of the hierarchies of power within the university system?”  In this talk, we will present our study’s findings, implications for future research, and next steps for conversations and collaborations with TAs. This would be useful for anyone who works in a similar setting where TAs have control over assignments or library instruction programs curious about switching to a train-the-trainer model.

Speakers
avatar for Alyssa Russo

Alyssa Russo

Learning Services Librarian, University of New Mexico
avatar for Glenn Koelling

Glenn Koelling

Learning Services Librarian/English Liaison, University of New Mexico
My dog's name is Doodle.


Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

9:30am

Empowering Students to Learn Their Way: Making Library Instruction Accessible to All With Universal Design for Learning
Often within Libraries, we instinctively provide inclusive instruction, but sometimes we may be missing groups of students with invisible disabilities, learning disabilities, or other different learning styles because their challenges are not immediately apparent. With the number of people with disabilities on the rise in the United States, colleges and universities are enrolling more students with disabilities and different learning styles. Because of this shift, we are now seeing a more diverse group of students in our library classrooms, whether that diversity is visible or invisible. Due to this increase, potentially those fun, engaging, and interactive lessons that we eagerly plan for our students may now not be as inclusive as we hope they are. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) promotes accessibility in the classroom by helping instructors design lessons to be accessible for the widest range of abilities. While these changes are becoming more commonplace in the higher education classroom, library instruction is not paying as much active attention to incorporating UDL principles as it should. Incorporating elements of UDL into library instruction helps students choose how they wish to engage with information literacy. Small changes in the way we teach information literacy can yield big results. This workshop will briefly teach participants about the major concepts of UDL and how it can be applied to information literacy instruction, then give participants the time and tools to start re-designing activities and lesson plans to ensure that they are providing equitable access to information literacy to all their students.

Speakers
SP

Samantha Peter

Instructional Design Librarian, University of Wyoming
avatar for Kristina Clement

Kristina Clement

Student Success Librarian, University of Wyoming


Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
MGH 295 (Seats 35)

9:30am

Harm Reduction & Threat Modeling for Library Instruction
Harm reduction and threat modeling are helpful ideas to explore library work and teaching. In the Library Freedom Institute, a six month digital privacy training program for library workers, we learned that harm reduction is a concept from the public health field that destigmatizes risky behaviors, while working to give people safer options. Threat modeling is a framework for identifying safety risks and the changes that can be taken to minimize those. Rather than shaming people for their behavior, harm reduction recognizes that we make decisions out of the complexity of our lives, and we can seek change while also meeting people where they are. A harm reduction approach aims to make choices less stark: even small changes with students or in your organization make you safer, and your community potentially more just.

These concepts can frame discussions around the parts of libraries we and students engage with on a daily basis, encouraging us to consider the strata of information privilege and the interplay of limits and realities. For example, how can you best work within systems that are built to hurt you (such as digital tracking embedded in our online research tools)? Historically, US libraries have been called to “educate the masses” and assimilate others into White culture. This extends into the standard one-shot in an academic library, as we reinforce ideas of what counts as scholarly or authoritative, often without questioning underlying power structures. We will use harm reduction to frame a reflective conversation about these and other concerns that participants bring.

Attendees will participate in demonstration versions of in-class activities that the presenters frequently teach, including a threat model focusing on the instructional technologies they use in the classroom and a digital privacy spectrum activity, and will leave with tools they can practice with students in the classroom and with colleagues.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly McElroy

Kelly McElroy

Student Engagement & Community Outreach Librarian, Oregon State University
Kelly McElroy is the Student Engagement and Community Outreach Librarian at Oregon State University Libraries & Press. She received her MLIS and Master of Archival Studies from the University of British Columbia. She organizes with her communities as a coordinator of the annual Zine... Read More →
avatar for Claire Lobdell

Claire Lobdell

Librarian, Greenfield Community College
I'm the distance education librarian at Greenfield Community College, where I teach information literacy skills to in-person and online students. I’ve worked for close to a decade in libraries and archives. In 2017, I published South Windsor, an installment in the Images of America... Read More →
avatar for Megan Kinney

Megan Kinney

Electronic Collections Librarian, City College of San Francisco


Friday July 24, 2020 9:30am - 10:45am
MGH 228 (Seats 35)

11:00am

North to the Future: Achieving Justice in an Age of Information Privilege
We are now surrounded by information 24/365, so how is it that information privilege is on the rise? This session addresses the complex question of information privilege and highlights the goal of achieving justice through information-literacy instruction. After an introductory overview by the presenters, attendees will participate in a facilitated discussion to explore this topic and share methods and ideas from their own practice. The introductory overview will focus on our describing the unique aspects of life in Alaska: vast geography, a debilitating gap in access to technology; cultural and linguistic diversity.

The facilitated discussion will focus on questions such as:

-How do our library and local community environments exacerbate the injustice that lies at the heart of information privilege?
-How may national and international statements about access to information as a basic human right help in the quest for justice?
-How does the era of fake news impact our ability as professionals to bridge the gaps caused by information privilege?
-How do we address and overcome information privilege through our library instruction to bridge these gaps?
-How do we achieve best practices in an era of declining budgets?
Discussion around these questions by the facilitators and attendees, as well as other ideas from attendees will help to foster greater understanding of this complex issue.


Friday July 24, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 337 (Seats 24)

11:00am

Doing Justice in the Queer Archive: Interrogating the Politics of Inclusion through Primary Sources
This lesson plan demonstration models best practices relating to the use of queer archives in information literacy instruction for first-year students and the unique learning opportunities provided by this approach. Using primary source materials from the Archives of Sexuality & Gender, students interrogate the politics of inclusion within social movements to inform justice-oriented actions. Particular care is taken to make the activities accessible for students who may lack contextual knowledge of queer history, hands-on experience with primary sources, and who are developing their understanding of the research process.

After a brief introduction to the lesson, attendees will participate in a hands-on activity examining a selection of primary source documents related to the Lavender Menace and the National Organization for Women. This exploration asks participants if and how lesbian activists influenced the women’s movement and uncovers differing goals, tactics, stereotypes and perspectives regarding the women’s movement and lesbian liberation, disrupting the notion of movements as monoliths. By interrogating the rich narratives contained in the queer archive, students understand such collections not as neutral repositories of facts, but as organizations that collect and fashion histories of a particular time and place, shared communal settings, and distinct cultural moments. Whole group discussion will conclude the session.

Although this lesson plan originates from a small liberal arts institution, the ideas and structure can be adapted for many purposes and for use in a wide variety of academic environments. Attendees should be willing to actively participate. Samples of instructional materials, as well as copies of the lesson plan and activities will be available.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Curtis

Katherine Curtis

Humanities Librarian, University of Puget Sound
Katy Curtis is a Humanities Librarian at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington. She received her BA from the University of South Florida, her MA in Modern Languages with a specialization in French from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and MLIS from the University... Read More →


Friday July 24, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
MGH 228 (Seats 35)

11:00am

Two Approaches to Addressing Information Privilege and Empowering STEM Learners
This session will discuss two information literacy lessons used at the Colorado School of Mines (Mines) to teach both undergraduate and graduate students about information privilege in STEM.  Presenters will walk through the lessons, including development, implementation, successes and lessons learned.  There will be opportunities for attendees to discuss the lessons in small groups and reflect on how they could be applied to their own institutional context.  

The first lesson, Standing on the Shoulders of Giants, is a one-shot in our First-Year Success Seminar. Students explore the scholarly conversation by tracking research related to a historically significant scientist or engineer’s work. Lesson examples include a diverse set of researches; including Alan Touring, Grace Hopper, and Mae Jemison. The lesson’s activity encourages students to explore the invisible barriers in our most commonly used research sources. In addition to the lesson’s learning outcomes, our students are able to see researchers like themselves, many from underrepresented backgrounds, in the scholarly conversation.
The second lesson, The Power Dynamics of Information is a graduate-level workshop, exploring barriers to information access and emerging publishing trends; for example the serials crisis and the Open Science movement. In the activity, students conduct research in their discipline without using any of the library’s resources. They explore and evaluate the types of information freely available and reflect on how barriers impact their ability to participate in the research of their discipline. Students learn about difficulties faced by independent researchers, the public and less well-funded institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Brianna Buljung

Brianna Buljung

Teaching & Learning Librarian, Colorado School of Mines
As the Teaching & Learning Librarian at Mines, Brianna coordinates the Library’s information literacy program, partnering with faculty across campus to incorporate information literacy skills into the curriculum. Prior to joining Mines, she served as a contract reference librarian... Read More →
avatar for Emily Bongiovanni

Emily Bongiovanni

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Colorado School of Mines


Friday July 24, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
MGH 234 (Seats 35)

11:00am

Faculty status and information literacy: Our power in the classroom and the curriculum
In this session, we will explore how the professional status of librarians shapes and informs our ability to effectively deliver information literacy instruction, both within the classroom and at the institutional level. There is significant variation across institutions in how librarians are classified and their position relative to instructional faculty. It is our experience that professional status can impact a librarian’s effectiveness in classroom instruction due to perceived power in the classroom, relationships with instructional faculty, and access to professional development opportunities. At the institutional level, status often dictates the ability of librarians to contribute to and shape the programmatic and general education curricula. While there is a significant and ongoing conversation in the scholarly literature about professional status for librarians, how status relates to instructional effectiveness has not been well explored, perhaps because the manifestations depend so much on unique institutional governance processes and individual relationships.

In this panel discussion, we will explore these nuances. We will share our own experiences with advocating for improved institutional status for librarians, including the role of unions in protecting working conditions and efforts at multiple institutions to modify the faculty handbook to explicitly define librarians as faculty. These and other processes continue to illuminate inherent power differences and impact information literacy instruction and programming. We will invite the audience to reflect upon their own experiences with positional power and how those shape their ability to teach. This will include time to discuss strategies based on the panel presentation for how to build power in their institutions to improve their teaching conditions.

Speakers
avatar for Freeda Brook

Freeda Brook

Acquisitions and Resource Management Librarian, Luther College


Friday July 24, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 332 (Seats 120)

11:00am

Universal Design for Learning: Empowering Learners Using Digital Learning Objects
The session will include an overview of Universal Design for Learning (UDL).  Central to UDL are the choices instructors make to ensure a lack of barriers to achieving learning objectives.  UDL focuses on flexibility in information presentation and interaction, along with accessible assessment and infusion of methods to pique and sustain interest.  The facilitators will provide background context about Washington State University’s Roots of Contemporary Issues (RCI, HIST 105/305) program and the accompanying LibGuide, which was identified by the facilitators as an important tool that required updating.  This LibGuide serves as valuable curricular material to thousands of students, supplemental to the main assignment prompts, and as the location of the UDL interventions central to this session.  Digital learning objects create opportunities for meeting UDL’s goals extending beyond the baseline obligation to meet standard accessibility guidelines. The presenters will illustrate, through a side-by-side comparison, how the UDL elements were added to the LibGuide and accessibility compliance was achieved.  In addition to using basic web analytics to explain changes in LibGuide use before and after the introduction of UDL features, the educators will also offer usability study results, focused on how students with barriers are impacted.  The session will include ample time for participants to ask questions about any/all facets of UDL and discuss potential opportunities for inclusion in their own instructional settings.

Speakers
JS

Jen Saulnier

Undergraduate Services Librarian, Washington State University


Friday July 24, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
MGH 295 (Seats 35)

11:00am

Epistemic bias in the information literacy classroom
Since the publication of her 2007 monograph Epistemic Injustice, Miranda Fricker’s conceptual framework of epistemic injustice has been widely discussed across disciplines as a useful lens through which we can explore how humans relate to one another as both knowers and seekers of knowledge. It has not, however, yet been widely discussed within the context of libraries and librarianship. Given the growing conversation in our field surrounding librarians’ role in communicating the importance of truth and the potential pitfalls of unchecked or unacknowledged bias, this is an important moment for librarians and information professionals to interrogate how we communicate about “facts” and the potential biases within our practice which may be supporting structural inequity.

In an era of intensive focus on equipping citizens, students in particular, with the intellectual tools necessary to detect fallacies masquerading as truth, it is equally important to reflect on what we as information professionals and educators are espousing when discussing who or what students can trust. What roles do testimony and lived experience have in our classrooms, research, and lives? Instruction which begins and ends with scholarly publishing neither adequately prepares students for the epistemic landscape they face, nor addresses the narrow perspectives which have been and continue to be privileged in scholarly conversations.
By mapping Fricker’s notion of epistemic injustice on to ILI I hope to present a novel lens with which instruction librarians can consider how they address issues of authority both in their curriculum and pedagogy.

Speakers

Friday July 24, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

11:00am

Fake News LibGuides as Sites of Injustice
After the 2016 election, the term “fake news” became popular in media outlets. A rallying cry to fight this age of “post-truth” and misinformation reverberated throughout the United States, and librarians were there to answer the call in the best way they knew how: by creating LibGuides. Hundreds of Fake News LibGuides were created in an attempt to educate students and fight misinformation, and librarians re-positioned themselves as the gatekeepers of truth. As part of an ongoing, grounded theory research project, the presenters observed and analyzed the content included in Fake News LibGuides. They observed that Fake News LibGuides are presented primarily as checklists, and many guides are virtually copies of one another. Further analysis revealed that copied guides were not vetted for accuracy and that checklists were used despite research critiquing their reliability in teaching source evaluation. The hypocrisy of publishing content about misinformation without verifying sources is an injustice to students. Additionally, creating Fake News LibGuides with unvetted content to position librarians as experts in misinformation while ignoring the complexity of information creation and evaluation by using checklists misleads students, dismisses students’ ability to critically examine content, and places librarians in an unearned position of authority. Drawing on the study and an extensive literature review, the presenters will discuss how Fake News Libguides are used as a tool to inflict injustice upon students; how the complexity of mis-information is multi-disciplinary and goes beyond the limited structure of LibGuides; and how conversations are better suited for engaged classroom settings.

Key Takeaways
  • Current iterations of Fake News LibGuides are an injustice to students because librarians are positioning themselves as experts when they haven’t critically analyzed the content included in the first place.
  • Fake News Libguides were created by librarians, for librarians, and suggesting that they promote information literacy is an injustice to students
  • Adding “check your bias” as an afterthought to a checklist is an injustice to any student harmed by unconscious bias because it ignores the work it takes to recognize and address bias (work that many librarians have not done before creating the guide). 
  • Checklists are a poor tool to teach evaluation and assess the complexity of information, and many Fake News LibGuides are essentially elaborate checklists; taking a complex process and telling students that it is easy is misleading and assumes students cannot critically think for themselves.


Speakers
avatar for Melissa DeWitt

Melissa DeWitt

Regis University
avatar for Erin Richter-Weikum

Erin Richter-Weikum

Information and Research Specialist
Erin is a research and information specialist for a consulting firm in San Francisco where she supports consultants in secondary research primarily around technology and healthcare. She is also the data management and governance specialist and loves talking her co-workers ears off... Read More →


Friday July 24, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 334 (Seats 60)

11:00am

Instructing Entrepreneurs in an Unjust Information Environment
Business information is complex and requires a great deal of knowledge to navigate successfully. Secondary research skills in business, marketing, and entrepreneurship are not well-covered in standard coursework in undergraduate or graduate work. In addition, the resources that are emphasized are often costly, highly marketed, and specialized,    and are inaccessible for many libraries and businesses. This benefits those entrepreneurs who are already affiliated with institutions with the means to access this information, perpetuating inequality in information and economic success.

This session will focus on low-to-no-cost resources in business research and how to effectively incorporate them into library instruction. After introducing participants to the issues of injustice in the business information environment, I will discuss solutions that can address the needs of entrepreneurs. This will including low-to-no-cost library resources, community-specific business resources such as funding groups, and partnerships with local public libraries to reduce costs and promote programming.

Speakers
avatar for Mariah McGregor

Mariah McGregor

Business & Entrepreneurship Librarian, Northwestern Univeristy


Friday July 24, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 340 (Seats 25)

11:00am

“Who’s Afraid of WikiLeaks"
Most academic libraries promote resource guides as lists of recommended resources curated by librarians with subject-specific knowledge. And yet, the vast majority of institutions don’t include WikiLeaks as a part of their curated research guides’ recommended resources.  We recently conducted a search of 116 ARL institutions’ research guide platforms, and discovered that only one member library (ours) chose to curate an entire guide tab or page on WikiLeaks. Only seven ARL libraries’ research guide pages contain a hyperlink to WikiLeaks or a specific leak. In contrast, we discovered that most libraries link to other open information tools like Google and Wikipedia.

Do we as a profession consider WikiLeaks unworthy of curation in research guides and perhaps by extension unworthy of teaching? Our broader professional culture has long championed its commitment to the defense of freedom of information. Is this disconnect worth exploration? Are we afraid of WikiLeaks?
We hope to create an opportunity at Library Instruction West for conversation about why we share what we share and suppress what we suppress online. How do we privilege certain types of information over others? We also hope to open up space for librarians to discuss WikiLeaks as a source. What do we know about this source, and how might we teach with it? How does WikiLeaks figure into our conversations about misinformation and propaganda?

Speakers
avatar for Stacy Nakamura Brinkman

Stacy Nakamura Brinkman

Head of Education and Outreach, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Brian Williams

Brian Williams

Research Librarian for Criminology, Law & Society, Political Science, U.S. & California Government, University of California Irvine
My interests run to WikiLeaks, Whistleblowers, Algorithms, The First Amendment, Crime, ... [boots selvedge denim dark deafening music mr robot lars von trier]


Friday July 24, 2020 11:00am - 12:15pm
HUB 334 (Seats 60)